Flip Flops or Boots? Unpredictable Weather

During+the+Winter+season%2C+the+idea+of+a+frosty+landscape+comes+to+mind+for+many+Coloradans.+But+this+image+may+stray+far+from+the+reality+that+the+state+has+experienced+in+2018.+The+total+amount+of+percipitation+has+decreased+by+more+than+half+in+the+years+2016-2018+as+compared+to+2015-2016%2C+according+to+the+National+Weather+Service.
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Flip Flops or Boots? Unpredictable Weather

During the Winter season, the idea of a frosty landscape comes to mind for many Coloradans. But this image may stray far from the reality that the state has experienced in 2018. The total amount of percipitation has decreased by more than half in the years 2016-2018 as compared to 2015-2016, according to the National Weather Service.

During the Winter season, the idea of a frosty landscape comes to mind for many Coloradans. But this image may stray far from the reality that the state has experienced in 2018. The total amount of percipitation has decreased by more than half in the years 2016-2018 as compared to 2015-2016, according to the National Weather Service.

Photo courtesy of Shelby L. Bell (CC BY 2.0)

During the Winter season, the idea of a frosty landscape comes to mind for many Coloradans. But this image may stray far from the reality that the state has experienced in 2018. The total amount of percipitation has decreased by more than half in the years 2016-2018 as compared to 2015-2016, according to the National Weather Service.

Photo courtesy of Shelby L. Bell (CC BY 2.0)

Photo courtesy of Shelby L. Bell (CC BY 2.0)

During the Winter season, the idea of a frosty landscape comes to mind for many Coloradans. But this image may stray far from the reality that the state has experienced in 2018. The total amount of percipitation has decreased by more than half in the years 2016-2018 as compared to 2015-2016, according to the National Weather Service.

Olivia Semple, Staffer

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Standing in the doorway of her house, Lauren Crippen prepares to leave for her walk to the bus stop. Goosebumps pepper her body, and she shivers. Dressed in shorts and a tank, Lauren is not prepared for the 28-degree weather.

Stomping back upstairs she throws on pants and a warm jacket before leaving her house for the bus. Much later, she sweats walking home from school, as the weather has changed to 65 and sunny.

New to Colorado, Crippen has to learn to adapt to the unpredictable weather. Living in Aurora, it can either be freezing or blazing hot. Through the winter months of November through February, civilians know to always pack boots, and flip-flops.

“Ever since I was a kid I can remember the weather before and after school,” Colorado native Bella Cummings (9) said, “It would be snowing and freezing, and after school, the snow would be gone and it would be in the 60s.”

Crippen, native to California, remembers when she thought 60 degrees was cold. “My friends text me throughout the day saying that they are freezing in 60 degrees. I just say its 17 and snowing, “ Crippen said. “It’s so weird waking up here and looking out my window to see snow on the rooftops. “

On November 11, 2018 Lauren decided to go sledding on a snow-covered hill. She tied her snow boots and velcroed her snow pants shut.

When friend Olivia Philson arrived in sweats and a light sweater, Crippen is confused by her clothing choice.

“Since moving here from Texas, I dress light and pack warm. That way if it’s hot outside I don’t have to take layers off, but if it’s cold I can easily put something on, “ Philson said. The Philson family has lived here since May, and have already adjusted to the changing temperatures.

“What I’ve learned, is to just be prepared for everything, rain or shine. This state is so beautiful, and the unpredictable weather just adds onto its richness, “ Philson said.

 

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